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  • AsianPLoP

    AsianPLoP

    Asian Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (PLoP) conference is a premier event for pattern authors and users to gather, discuss and learn more about patterns and software development in the Asia region as well as other regions. The purpose of AsianPLoP is to promote development of patterns, pattern languages, technologies and experiences of patterns primarily about software; however, these for domains outside of software are also welcome.Visit the Asian PLoP Official Site   Read More
  • EuroPLoP

    EuroPLoP

    EuroPLoP is the premier European conference on patterns and pattern languages. EuroPLoP 2017 will be held again at Kloster Irsee, Bavaria, Germany. At this fantastic venue you will experience a creative and constructive atmosphere that inspires your work. Visit the EuroPLoP Official Site. Read the full story Read More
  • ScrumPLoP

    ScrumPLoP

    ScrumPLoP is a PLoP® conference. It will be a gathering of experienced Scrum practitioners, assembled with the goal of contributing to the body of pattern literature with proven practices. If you don't yet know what a PLoP conference is, read about what a PLoP is here. Visit the ScrumPLoP Official Site. Read More
  • Viking PLoP

    Viking PLoP

    VikingPLoP contains writer’s workshops for submitted pattern papers, focus groups, and other activities. The conference provides participants with the opportunity to share their experience about patterns and software. As with the PLoP series of conferences, our overall goal is to build a community of patterns' people. VikingPLoP especially encourages submissions related to embedded systems, however, also other pattern-related topics are very welcome. Read More
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Pattern Books

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Template and Copyright Notice

Templates to create your camera-ready copy for the proceedings are available in Word and LaTeX, otherwise ACM might not accept the paper for the digital library.

The recommended template is ACM's single column format customized for PLoP. An example with PLoP's copyright notice can be found in this PDF, and the template is provided here:

Note: Use the following ACM Classification for Categories and Terms ACM Classification

Please use the following text as the copyright notice on the first page.

Permission to make digital or hard copies of all or part of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full citation on the first page. To copy otherwise, to republish, to post on servers or to redistribute to lists, requires prior specific permission. A preliminary version of this paper was presented in a writers' workshop at the 2Xth Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs (PLoP). PLoP'XX, OCTOBER XX-YY, Allerton, Illinois, USA. Copyright 20xx is held by the author(s). HILLSIDE 978-1-XXXXXX-XX-X

Alternatively, ACM's two-column template will also be accepted. In this case, it is of particular importance that you leave sufficient space in the lower left corner of the first column on the first page, to insert the copyright information.

Authors, how was your last shepherding experience?
Here is a scale of shepherding excellence to think about.

Shepherds, where do you think your "sheep" would rate you?

1. Oh, I had a shepherd?

2. My shepherd made contact, and promised to send comments.

3. My shepherd actually sent a set of comments.

4. My shepherd was positive and supportive.

5. My shepherd was prompt.

6. The comments from my shepherd had substance; not just grammar and wording.

7. My shepherd gave me two or more sets of comments.

8. I learned more about patterns from my shepherd.

9. I learned more about my own topic.

10. My shepherd helped me learn more about myself.


Shepherds, how well did your "sheep" do?

Authors, where do you think your shepherd would rate you?

1. Never heard from the author.

2. The author apologized for not responding.

3. Got one revision -- just before the shepherding deadline.

4. Ignored all my suggestions.

5. Was clueless.

6. Really did try to improve the patterns.

7. Sent two or three revisions.

8. I learned more about patterns from the shepherding experience.

The Pattern community is unique in the individual mentoring we give to each other through shepherding. Many of us have learned a great deal from our shepherds. Many of us enjoy serving as shepherds because it is so rewarding to help others improve their patterns.

Shepherding requires commitment and follow-through by both the shepherd and the author. When you as an author submit a work to a PLoP conference, you implicitly promise to do certain things. Likewise, when you agree to shepherd a paper, you make promises as well. Here is what we expect from both:

The Author:

  • Respond to the Shepherd. The shepherd will be giving you help, free of charge. When you get comments, turn around a new draft of your patterns quickly. You don't have to get it perfect; it is better to be timely than complete.

  • Give two or three Updates. We know you are busy, but just one updated paper right at the end of the shepherding session just doesn't cut it.

  • Attend the Conference. When you submit a paper, you imply that you will attend the conference if your paper is accepted. While we recognize that things do come up, it is your responsibility to arrange funding, visas, etc., in plenty of time for the conference. At this time, no PLoP is asking for a deposit at the beginning of shepherding, but it could happen if people continue to abuse it.

  • Thank the Shepherd. Ok, this is kind of a no-brainer, but it bears repeating. The shepherd is donating time and expertise. The least you can do is thank your shepherd.

The Shepherd:

  • Contact your Author Promptly. Do it right away; the same day you get the paper assigned. It really takes no time at all, and it gets shepherding started on the right foot.

  • Give two or three Iterations of Comments. So plan your time accordingly. You don't have to get everything right; it's better to be prompt than complete.

  • Focus on Substance. This is shepherding, not proofreading.

  • Keep the Program Committee in the Loop. Don't forget to copy your mails to your PC member.

  • Have High Standards. It's ok to demand excellence of the author. At the conclusion of shepherding, you will be asked your assessment of the paper. Don't recommend acceptance just because the author is a nice person, or they really tried. If a paper is accepted, it will be workshopped by as many as ten people. Don't cause them to waste their time on junk.

Shepherds and Sheep:
Rate your Shepherding Experience!

This document represents some guidelines for accepting papers for the PLoP conferences. Any feedback is welcome.


Multiple Paper Submissions

  1. Quick pass read by members of PC to eliminate papers that are in the
    wrong conference or don't pass muster.

  2. Guarantee that at least one author will attend conference -- before
    shepherding -- but how can we back this up?

  3. One author - one paper -- is this too harsh?

  4. Only the author can represent the paper at a workshop, if author can't
    attend, paper is dropped from workshop

  • Hillside Fellowship Award 2016
  • Security Patterns in Practice
  • PLoP Conference Proceedings
  • Asian PLoP
  • EuroPLoP

The Hillside Fellowship Award

Congratulations to Ralph Johnson and Richard Gabriel for being presented the first Hillside Fellowship award at the 2016 PLoP event at Allerton, PLoP 2016 .

Hilside Fellowship Award Recipients 2016

The Hillside Fellowship Program was established in 2016 to recognize members of The Hillside Group who have made exceptional contributions to the Hillside community and to the patterns community at large. The

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Security Patterns in Practice

Eduardo Fernandez's new book " Security Patterns in Practice: Designing Secure Architectures with Software Patterns " has been published.

SecurityPatternsInPractice

It is the result of 14 years of producing security patterns with students and colleagues. Almost all of these patterns went through PLoP, EuroPLoP, AsianPLoP, or SugarLoafPLoP. Many of you have participated as shepherds or workshop commentators, the book

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PLoP Conference Proceedings

After the PLoP Workshops, writers are encouraged to modify their papers and submit a final version. The final versions are collected and submitted to the ACM Digital Library. The versions are also available from the conference website.

Conference Proceedings (ACM Digital Library)

Some of the PLoP accepted papers have been published on the ACM Digital Library . The

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Asian PLoP

The premier Asian conference on
Pattern Languages of Programs

AsianPLoP solicits paper submissions written in both of English and Japanese; English papers and Japanese ones will be discussed in different sessions. Both practitioners from the industry and academics are invited to submit their papers. The conference solicits the papers for the following different sessions. Details can be found in Topics

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EuroPLoP

European Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs

EuroPLoP is a conference that explores, develops and celebrates patterns in software. As with PLoP in the US, the main focus of EuroPLoP will be a series of writer's workshops where pattern authors work together to improve their patterns.

In addition to these workshops there will be discussion groups, BOF sessions and

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TPLoP

Learn More about Patterns

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